Cappadocia, Land of the Beautiful Horses

I’m rewinding the clock today.  Back in 2012 we took a trip to Cappadocia in central Turkey.  It was a no-brainer trip while we were living there.  Secret passages, hidden caves and vats of wine.  There was a lot to like.

Fairy chimneys
Fairy chimneys.

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Evil Eye

Time Warp Tuesday VII                                                                            Istanbul, 2011

Everywhere you go in Turkey, fixed on front doors, swinging from taxi rearview mirrors and even incorporated into jewellery designs, you will see Nazaar Beads. They are flat, blue, circular glass ‘eye’ beads. They are to deflect, distract and ward off the evil eye or bad luck with their bright colour.

nazaar

However, should your nazaar bead crack or break, unlike the 7 years of bad luck associated with cracking a mirror, it means that the bead has done its job and warded off some invisible evil or bad luck that was heading your way. Then all you have to do is buy a replacement bead to continue to live in peace and harmony. A neat marketing ploy!

We discovered a shop called Pasabache. The shop sells both ‘life’ products, i.e. everyday kitchen wear and also boutique items – which include a selection of covetable, beautiful, fragile and more expensive Turkish glass wear and ceramic (including high-end giant Nazaar beads). As we entered the artfully lit boutique display area, Pickle looked around and gleefully yelled: “Ikea Mummy”.  I gave him the evil eye* and we left very quickly.

* In modern English giving somebody the evil eye just means glaring at somebody, not cursing them.  Just to be absolutely clear, I did not put a curse on Pickle, I was just embarrased and gave him a cross look. 

Time Warp Tuesday: Wrong Turn

August 2011 – Istanbul:  First Impressions 
We’re finally here all together after six long months of Mr Incredible having an horrendous bi-weekly Istanbul-London commute. It’s hot and sunny and the children in particular are getting lots of warm smiles and attention from everyone.  Pickle especially attracts cries of “cok guzel” (pronounced choc-goozelle) and is often scooped up and cheek-pinched by complete strangers.  He’s not entirely sure about this hands-on attention being more accustomed to a restrained British smile or coo-ee.

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